Embrace social engagement, impartiality, basic policing: Mishra; Senior IPS officer tells mantra for maintaining communal harmony

By Lokmat English Desk | Published: June 14, 2024 12:55 AM2024-06-14T00:55:02+5:302024-06-14T00:55:02+5:30

Chhatrapati Sambhajinagar: It is possible to deliver justice to citizens based on the three principles of communication with society, ...

Embrace social engagement, impartiality, basic policing: Mishra; Senior IPS officer tells mantra for maintaining communal harmony | Embrace social engagement, impartiality, basic policing: Mishra; Senior IPS officer tells mantra for maintaining communal harmony

Embrace social engagement, impartiality, basic policing: Mishra; Senior IPS officer tells mantra for maintaining communal harmony

Chhatrapati Sambhajinagar: It is possible to deliver justice to citizens based on the three principles of communication with society, impartiality, and basic policing. As technology policing gains importance, the traditional basic policing is also crucial. Effective communication with society is essential as tense situations can be defused promptly. The lack of ties with people and absence of impartiality lead to tension, said Special Inspector General of Police, Chhatrapati Sambhajinagar range Virendra Mishra. In the wake of various social movements and recent Lok Sabha elections, Mishra discussed a variety of topics with senior editorial staff during his visit to Lokmat Bhavan on Tuesday. Considering the growing economic and cybercrimes, the police will need to embrace new technologies and train extensively on various subjects. Urban policing differs significantly from rural areas, and we are currently studying difficulties faced by the police. Soon, a report will be prepared, along with effective solutions, he added.

Excerpts from interview:

Q: Is maintaining communal harmony a challenge?

A: I joined Khamgaon as a sub-divisional officer in 2008. Until 2014, I had to face various issues of law and order in Beed and Akola. The experiences from that time are now proving useful in my work. Many contentious incidents stem from posts on social media. Social media units have been established in Chhatrapati Sambhajinagar, Jalna, Beed, and Dharashiv. When controversial posts are found, the individuals involved are called in for interrogation. Timely legal action has helped to prevent many contentious incidents.

Q: What can be reasons behind the law and order issues?

A: There is always some background to any tense situation. The police need to study and understand local circumstances and anticipate potential conflicts. Effective communication and understanding with citizens play a crucial role. Furthermore, the ability of the team leader, power of analysis, trust, and quick decision-making help the police.

Q: The Indian Penal Code and Criminal Procedure Code are being replaced with the Bharatiya Nyaya Sanhita. Is the administration ready to handle the change?

A: Changes have been made in the age-old law as per changing time. Each new change brings its own challenges. The police will need to internalize new laws. Training has been provided extensively, and it will be useful.

Q: Your take on the rising cybercrimes.

A: Privacy is a myth in these days of technological advancements. Day by day, the world is getting complicated. Cybercrimes are increasing because of greed and lack of caution. In the era of the internet, being aware and staying vigilant is crucial.

No alternative to basic policing

There is no alternative to basic policing. Complaints must be heard at the police stations. That a complainant has to go to senior officials is itself failure of the police station. If there is merit in the complaint, then a case should be registered or a call be taken after proper investigation.

Journalist, teacher to successful IPS officer

Virendra Mishra, who hails from Rewa in Madhya Pradesh, holds a degree in law. He also pursued journalism from the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, Delhi and worked in various national media groups before teaching Hindi literature for three years in Uttar Pradesh. He passed UPSC in 2006 to become an IPS officer.

Key positions held

2008-10: Sub-divisional Officer, Khamgaon

2010-11: Assistant Superintendent of Police, Beed 2011-14: Superintendent of Police, Akola.

After Akola, he served as Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) and Additional Commissioner of Police in Mumbai for 9 years, then as DCP in Pune for one year.

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